WC-match: day 5

By MI Wouter Sipma

‘The famous law of sports: if you don’t score yourself, your opponent will do it’. Today these were the words Jacob Okken said to me when the decision in today’s match was made. There is no better way to summarize today’s games; while GMI Alexander Georgiev had more and more success in the consecutive games and even a winning position in the blitz games, he didn’t realize a victory. In the LG-tiebreak GMI Alexander Schwarzman gained advantage for the first time and he díd manage to convert it into a victory.

Classical game

Georgiev-Schwarzman, classical game

I want to waste just one diagram for this game; with his last move, 13. … 20-24, Schwarzman more or less forces the game course. If white doesn’t play the game move, 17-21 follows and white has to take to 28 (otherwise 14-20 follows); that position would be particularly interesting for black.  14. 37-31 26×37 15. 41×32 24-29 16. 33×24 19×30 17. 35×24 14-20 18. 25×14 9×40 19. 45×34. Well. It’s clear that Schwarzman doesn’t want anything else than a draw… In the video on the site he tells he didn’t sleep all night, so it is kind of logical. Georgiev still tried something, but didn’t realize anything.

Rapid

The same image in this game; Schwarzman tries to play safely. The difference is that Georgiev got some real advantage.

Schwarzman-Georgiev, rapid (I)

Black has a nice position; he is well in control of square 24, as the game will prove. Furthermore the base pieces 3 and 4 are still present. White has a less nice position, the piece on 44 allows the game move. However, white has a lead of 6 temps and therefore is able to survive without many problems. 36. … 14-20(!) In this way blacks keeps his advantage. 30-25 is prohibited (of course) and 20-25 is a positional threat. Thus 37. 33-29 24×33 38. 38×29. Now the white position would be active enough after 38. … 20-25 39. 44-39 19-23 40. 39-33 and black can’t benefit from the somewhat unbalanced distribution of pieces. For example 40. … 17-22 41. 42-38 (after 33-28, 23×21, 26×28 there are some surrounding chances because of the weakened white wing) 22×31 42. 26×37 12-17 43. 38-32 17-21(!) 44. 37-31 (33-28?, 21-27!) 21-26 45. 31-27 18-22(!) 46. 27×18 23×12 47. 32-27 12-17 48. 33-28 and despite the weakened white wing, black can’t benefit from it, because white owns the entire centre. That’s why Georgiev played the other logical move 38. … 18-23! 39. 29×18 12×23 40. 42-38 20-24. Now black holds square 24 again. 41. 44-39 3-9(!) 42. 38-33 9-14

Schwarzman-Georgiev, rapid (II)

By playing with piece 3 instead of piece 4, black still can use 23-29 later on. A computer would now make a draw via 43. 27-22 17×28 44. 33×22 7-11 45. 26-21! and after 23-29 the remaining 3 versus 2 is a draw… These players would also be able to see such a variation, but apparently Schwarzman didn’t have worries about the game course. 43. 30-25 7-12 44. 34-30 23-29 45. 27-22 29×38 46. 22×11 12-17 47. 11×22 39-43 48. 22-17(!) and because 14-20, 42-48 doesn’t work, white reached a draw without further problems.

Blitz

In this game Schwarzman played according to the (for him) so well-known paths in the opening and so he did nothing special. Georgiev however chose an original plan (5. 38-32, 9.35-30), which Schwarzman handled well in the first instance and seemed to have a better position. However Georgiev’s position developed well and an interesting battle arose.

Georgiev-Schwarzman, blitz (I)

With black’s last move (34. … 3-8), he forces an exchange, since 37-32 (26-31) and 38-32 (24-29!) are not good. But the exchange made by white is anything but passive and is often an important option in similar positions. 35. 27-22(!) 18×27 36. 28-23 19×28 37. 33×11. The characteristics of the position remain; white wants to benefit from the black edge pieces, while black plays against the piece on 36 and probably tries to control both wings. In the game it will become a big success for white. It’s hard to find a good plan for black; in the game the pieces on black’s right wing hopelessly remain there. For example 37. … 12-18 38. 31-27(!) 7-12 39. 34-29(!) 24×33 40. 38×29 is also uncomfortable for black. Maybe acting actively on the wing using 37. … 16-21(!) is best; for example after 38. 38-32 6-11 39. 31-27 11-16 40. 42-38 12-18 41. 38-33 7-12 42. 33-29 24×33 43. 39×28 18-23 44. 28×19 13×24 there is no disadvantage for black. But I didn’t see black’s problems coming and apparently Schwarzman neither… 37. … 13-19 38. 31-27 8-13 39. 34-29(!) 24×33 40. 38×29 19-24 41. 29×20 25×14. Still there seem to be few problems for black. However the formation 48-42-37 will turn out to be priceless for white. 42. 39-33 14-20 43. 44-39

43. … 20-24(?) This move proves to be wrong. But what should black do? A nice idea is 43. … 12-18 by making use of 44. 33-29(?) 10-15! 45. 35-30 16-21! (13-19?, 27-22, 29-23, 30-24, 37-31, 42×24+) 46. 27×16 13-19 with a draw. After 43. … 12-18 44. 39-34 black has another tough decision to make… 44. … 13-19 will simply be met by 45. 37-31! 26×37 46. 42×31 and white wins, since 20-24 is also prohibited. This maneuver also plays a big role in the game. 44. 39-34! 12-18? 45. 33-28! Now there is really a reason for panic for black. With the odd-loooking 44. … 13-19 45. 33-28 7-11 black probably would have endured quite well, because the white ideas don’t work out well. 44. … 10-14? 45. 34-30! 13/14-19 46. 33-28! 24-29 47. 37-31! 26×37 48. 42×31 is similar to the game course. 45. … 6-11? Black’s problem is that after 45. … 13-19(?) white won’t play 28-23, 27-22, 37-31, after which black can defend, but 46. 37-31! 26×37 47. 42×31 (threatens with a 2-for-3) 18-23 48. 28-22! followed by 22-17 with winning advantage for white. Here still the unnatural 45. … 7-11(!) was better, because after 46. 37-31 26×37 47. 42×31 black can play 11-17(!), in contrary to the game, which looks definitively losing. 46. 37-31! 26×37 47. 42×31 7-12 48. 34-30! 24-29 Now white can wait until blacks appears on square 17. 49. 48-43 10-14 50. 43-38 11-17 51. 28-22 17×28 52. 27-21 16×27 53. 31×24 18-22

Georgiev-Schwarzman, blitz (III)

This is the most important moment from today’s match; Georgiev has one piece more and has a winning position (of course). Here he had 41 seconds left, but decides to play a very concrete move after just 10 seconds of thinking. It is not possible, even for Georgiev, to calculate all variations in such a short time; however, if you play such a concrete move, you have to be sure that black cannot force a draw, like happens in the game… 54. 38-32? 13-18 55. 32-27 22×31 56. 36×27 12-17 57. 30-25 17-22 58. 27-21 (also 24-20, 22×31, 20×9, 31-36! is a draw) 14-19! In this way Schwarzman eventually secures the draw; perhaps Georgiev missed this exchange in his quick calculations; after 58. … 22-28 he surely would win by making a king on square 5. 59. 24×13 18×9 Now white doesn’t have any chance left and a few moves later the players agreed upon a draw. On the 54th move winning was possible by 36-31 or 30-25. In many variations black reaches a 4-vs-2 endgame, but it is losing. The game move is logical however; being white, you wouldn’t want to allow black to go to square 27, what happens after 36-31 (12-17, 31-26, 22-27) of 30-25 (22-27). It can be called paradoxical that white is only able to win if he doesn’t occupy square 27. Anyway, this disappointment hit Georgiev hard. After three good games, he didn’t maintain this level in the LG-tiebreak.

LG-tiebreak

For me there is one important moment in this game. After that the result of the game was almost certain for me.

Schwarzman-Georgiev, LG-tiebreak (I)

Schwarzman has built an active position and has a nice tempo advantage of 5. Here Georgiev played the wrong move: 25. … 19-23? I think practically any other move (while preventing white from nestling on 24) was stronger. According to Schwarzman’s playing style in the previous three games, Georgiev probably only considered 37-31… But now Schwarzman plays very sharp and actively and has a good reason to do that. The open square 2 is a big weakness in the black position. 26. 39-34! 15-20(?) Again a sharp move and in my view not a good choice in a LG-tiebreak; black’s position is harder to handle and needs more time, which is an important factor. 27. 35-30! 20-25 28. 30-24! I believe black ended up in a totally wrong position. He cannot threaten piece 24, while black has several problems: of course he should look after his piece on square 23 and he also has few possibilities to play on his right wing. After 17-21 white can always play 37-31 and black is frozen on that wing; after 7-11 black should watch out for losing a piece by 33-28; after 6-11, 37-31 black has to switch to 17-22; 17-22 (now or later) only helps white to develop his position, besides black should also consider 37×26 with an assault on piece 23. To maintain the options on the right flank, black first plays left: 28. … 4-10 29. 45-40 10-15 30. 40-35 17-21? Now black will get in very big troubles. But also after 17-22, 37-31 white has chances 31. 37-31!

31. … 25-30? 32. 34×25 23×34. Now perhaps the position is losing already. Only 31. … 12-17 32. 31-26 18-22 33. 27×18 23×12 etc. remained, but it’s clear that black is terribly worse in this variation also. 33. 33-28! Perhaps Georgiev planned 33. … 21-26?!? here, after which 35-30 is prohibited and 42-37 is met by 18-22; however, white has a good move: 34. 24-19! 13×24 35. 25-20! 26×37 36. 20×40, winning one piece. In the game Schwarzman doesn’t leave a chance for black: 33. … 7-11 34. 42-37 12-17 35. 48-42! 9-14 36. 31-26! 17-22 37. 26×17 22×31 38. 37×26 11×33 39. 38×40 and white had one piece more ánd a better position ánd a big time advantage. Georgiev still tried, but Schwarzman didn’t let him escape.

Well, that’s what I’m saying, but the display via the live games and the position on the board in the video, are different! And the position in the video on the site is definitely a draw!

Schwarzman-Georgiev, LG-tiebreak (III)

In this position the live display stops. Via a fairly logical variation one may get the position on the board in the video: 48. 20-15 12-18 49. 30-24 19×30 50. 25×34 9-13 51. 34-30 13-19 52. 30-25 18-23 53. 25-20 14×25 54. 15-10 23×32 55. 10-4? (55. 42-37 was winning!). However, in that position black can make a draw by 32-38! The vortex shot using 4-15, 38×47, 33-29 doesn’t work because the black king takes to 24. What happened in reality? Did Georgiev lose by time exceeding? That is correct, according to the site. But did this happen before he could play 47. … 18-22 and is that why the live display stopped? Or did his flag fall in the final position in the video? That would be extra sour… On the site one may read that Georgiev protested after the game about the sounds and movements made by Schwarzman during the game, which would have taken him out of his concentration. Schwarzman realizes this, but cannot do much about it… Anyway, Georgiev’s irritation is very imaginable after what happened in the blitz game and probably in the end of the LG-tiebreak…

Schwarzman increased his lead somewhat with this victory. If Georgiev wins the blitz game tomorrow, the players will be totally equal! In that case, the decision may only fell in the LG-tiebreak on the last day. Maybe it’s better if that doesn’t happen… Anyway, it is clear that Schwarzman has the best chances. He has been leading since the first day and that certainly plays a little bit easier…

Tomorrow the round will begin again at 9 o’clock (Dutch time), which can be seen via http://www.wcmm2013.fmjd.org/live-games.

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